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Blue-eyed Black Lemur
Female blue-eyed black lemur holding her young
Female blue-eyed black lemur holding her young



Basic Description:

The blue-eyed black lemur is in the primate family, which means it has leathery strong hands, grippy feet, and a long tail. It's natural habitat is in Northwest Madagascar, in between the Andranomalaza River and Befotaka. The average weight is 2-2.5 kg. The average length 90-100 cm, but the tail itself is 51-65 cm long. All have blue eyes although they can range from blue-gray to bright electric blue. Fur colors differ in males and females. Males are solid black with occasional brown tinged roots. Females are reddish brown with a lighter tan on their underbellies and outside of their faces. BOTH have dark brown muzzles, back of their hands, and feet.


The natural habitat of the blue-eyed black lemur in northwest Madagascar
The natural habitat of the blue-eyed black lemur in northwest Madagascar


Bulk of Scientific Information:

These lemurs a social creatures, usually found in groups of 7-10. They communicate through scent-marking, grunts, chirps, banks, clicks, and sometimes facial expressions. Males can issue a "scree" sort of scream when they are distressed. Both genders are highly aggressive. There is frequent fighting, especially during the breeding and birthing seasons. Females birth 1 or 2 young in June and July and they mature at 2 years. The lifespan is 15-30 years in captivity, only because we have no data for time span in the wild. Their diet includes fruit, pollen, and nectar, but during the dry season they may eat leaves, berries, seeds, and very rarely bugs. In desperate times they raid farmlands for food.They are efficient propagators; meaning they don't digest seeds from the fruit and their droppings spread the seeds around the forest.



Male lemur eating berries off of a branch during the dry season
Male lemur eating berries off of a branch during the dry season


Quick Facts:

  • Local names are Komba and Ankomba
  • They are the only primates besides humans to consistently have blue eyes
  • Commonly known as Sclater's Lemur
  • There are less than 1,000 Blue-eyed Black Lemurs in the wild due to deforestation for farmland
  • Of the protected forests in Madagascar, no lemurs are found there.
Link to Other Topic:
These lemurs are on the endangered species list because of massive deforestation. Logging is one the few economic industries the poor country of Madagascar has. By using the slash and burn method they are destroying hundreds of acres of natural habitat for the blue-eyed black lemur.

external image madagascar-deforestation-rate.jpg?w=348&h=505

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